Bonn, Beethoven and burning books!

3/8/16


Our ship docked in Bonn where we would go on a walking tour of the city. Our walk saw us go through the Hofgarten park and into the town square. I love how most European towns and cities all have a Town Square.

It was still raining so you still had to be careful on the cobblestones. Just getting off the ship was an art in itself! The gang-plank was very slippery and one wrong foot, in the river you go!

Our tour guide was very knowledgeable and I wish I had been able to record him, so I could listen to it later. At one stage when we were standing in the park it was all going over my head.  I couldn’t take it all in.  So I took lots of photos. However, I did learn quite a few things about Bonn.

The University of Bonn is the former residential palace of the Archbishop of Cologne, built by Enrico Zuccalli from 1697- 1705. It crosses two streets and one side overlooks the park of Hofgarten.

The University of Bonn

Statues of Ludwig van Beethoven are everywhere in Bonn his birthplace.

Ludwig Von Beethoven was born on 17th December 1770 in Bonn. Part of our tour we went and saw his birthplace.  Every where around the town of Bonn are statues of Beethoven. It’s quite funny as its widely known that Beethoven hated his birthplace.

The house where Ludwig Van Beethoven was said to have been born and raised in Bonn.

The Town Hall where in 1933 University students burned books during the Nazi period.

In 1933 saw University students burn books in front of the Town Hall during the Nazi period.  3 years ago they have made a memorial and there are  60 copper plaques of the books that were burnt that day.  It’s very somber to see these plaques in the cobblestones. To think  reading, writing and thinking was not allowed by the Nazi’s.

Ernest Hemingway’s books were burnt.

Sigmund Freud

Once the walking tour was finished we had some free time to wander the streets of Bonn. We would catch up with our guide in front of the Town Hall steps to be escorted back to the ship.

Rasberries, red currants, cherries and grapes. So colorful are the markets.

In the market place there are cafes and restaurants and every day there is a market. The choice of fresh fruit and vegetables was amazing, and all locally grown. We 3 purchased some berries, we did eat some, however we actually forgot we had them and 2 days later, in the bin they went. We at least helped the German economy by buying them 🙂

Look at these stunners!

My shop!

I even found a boutique named after me Bree!

We wandered into a boutique called Zero and Paula and I again helped the German economy! Would you believe I still have one of those tops, its my favorite! The European sizing was different to say the least, however the shop assistant was very helpful. Limited English and us with limited German we all did ok.

We literally stumbled on a coffee van where we purchased coffee and tea. Best coffee I had in a long time!

The Bonn economy certainly boomed from our spending.

After our shopping spree we met up with the Tour guide and made our way back to the ship.

Our next stop would be Cologne/Koln but there was ice cream on the ship to eat!

** Next will be our Ice-cream, and Cologne and that sunning Cologne Cathedral.**

12 Replies to “Bonn, Beethoven and burning books!”

  1. I wouldn’t have been too keen to disembark the ship, though better rain on the gang-plank than ice I suppose!

    That’s a good idea to record a tour guide so you can listen to it later. Maybe next time. I hadn’t thought of doing that but on any times I’ve had a tour somewhere, it’s been fascinating but it’s a lot to take in, and I tend to forget things pretty quickly!

    It sounds like a very poignant tour. I’m glad a memorial was put up with the plaques to remember the books burnt, and how oppressive it was in those days for Nazi’s to basically decide all free thought and writing was evil and not to be allowed. xx

    Liked by 1 person

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